Saturday, Aug 22 2009 

False Colors
FALSE COLORS
By
Alex Beecroft
Publisher: Running Press (April 13, 2009)
ISBN-10: 0762436581
ISBN-13: 978-0762436583
Paperback & Electronic

From the back cover: “1662. For his first command, John Cavendish is given both a ship and a crew in need of repair. … He hopes the well liked Lieutenant “Alfie” Donwell will stand by his side as he leads his new crew into battle: stopping the slave trade off the coast of Algiers.”

A damned, diabolical book, is this, by a damned, diabolical writer who captures you like a pirate and will not let go. Her author photos show a gentle, red-haired Englishwoman, but she is actually the reincarnation of Britain’s Vice Admiral Horatio Lord Nelson. If she isn’t, she’s channeling him. First came the Age of Sail gay romance, Captain’s Surrender. And now, in a novel that shows how she has grown in her craft, comes False Colors.

False Colors is a novel that’s half a poignant story of ships-passing-in-the-night male love, and half rip-roaring, swashbuckling, cannon-exploding, pirate fighting, iceberg-ramming Age of Sail adventure. Beecroft puts her characters through physical torture—literally—with stomach-turning details, and through psychological torture just as excruciating. This is one female author who can write convincingly of men at sea and men in lust and love.

The erotic scenes are well done, and worked seamlessly into the story. But the characters of John Cavendish and Alfie Donwell are finely drawn and the story so compelling that the sex scenes could be taken out and I wouldn’t miss them. The heart and the sinews of this book are not in scenes of physical sex but in the tormented souls of two young naval officers drawn inexorably to each other in a time when such love could put them both on a gallows. John and Alfie are separated through much of the book, but are never far from one another’s thoughts, though often the thoughts are bitter. And when they are together, they are at cross purposes caused by misunderstandings. The last chapter is one of the most truly erotic scenes I’ve ever seen, because it has everything—physical sensation, humor, tenderness, impatience—the works.

Beecroft’s research, as always, has been exhaustive; every sentence throbs with authenticity. She immerses you in research and detail so neatly that you don’t even think about it. You don’t read about bloody decks, splintered masts, and pirates burning men alive; you experience them. You can feel the manacles tear John’s wrists down to the bone. You can smell the roasting flesh and hear the screams. You feel the unbearable cold of the Arctic ice and feel the fear of every man aboard, knowing a certain death waits as their ship fills with icy water as the deadly beauty of an iceberg towers over them.

Beecroft’s skills have advanced amazingly since Captain’s Surrender. I can only wonder what she has in store for us next.

Want a great story with romance and pulse-racing sea adventure? Get this one!

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THE SEA HAWK by Brenda Adcock Saturday, Jun 6 2009 

the sea hawk

THE SEA HAWK
Brenda Adcock
Published by Yellow Rose Books
ISBN-10: 1935053108
ISBN-13: 978-1935053101

The tall, lean captain of the privateer strides the bloody deck of Le Faucon de Mer – Falcon of the Sea, cutlass in hand, short black hair whipped by the breeze, a striking figure in white shirt, tight breeches and boots, a ruthless figure that brooks no disobedience. The captain’s cutlass is as quick to enforce discipline among the crew as it is to cut down a British officer.

But that’s not the beginning of the story. The beginning lies not in the past but 150 years in the future, and it does not begin with the ruthless captain of a privateer but with a marine archaeologist named Julia Blanchard. With her personal life in shambles, Dr. Blanchard has turned her every thought to the newly discovered sunken vessel off the Georgia coast, which she has lovingly named The Georgia Peach. While she is foolishly diving alone, with a storm threatening, her boat is stolen by 21st century pirates. She manages to get on board unseen to take an extra air tank but is discovered. She escapes the threat of a brutal rape by diving back into the sea. But in escaping one fate, she finds herself facing another. Barely clinging to life, buffeted by the sea and fried by the sun, she drifts on the uncaring sea until she loses consciousness.

And thereby hangs the tale.

Julia Blanchard, burned, dehydrated, unable to speak, wakes up in 1814, on board a British frigate, rescued from the sea and certain death. Not long after her rescue, as she recovers her health due to her youth and strength, the frigate is captured by Le Faucon de Mer. It is then that Julia sees the captain of the privateer—a woman, by name Simone Moreau, called “Faucon”. (I picture a young Sigourney Weaver starring in the film).

Yes, Gentle Reader, this is a time traveling, f/f romance, if one must label books with a genre. But even if you have never read a book of this kind, I hope that you’ll give this one a try. It is an accurately depicted, meticulously researched “age of sail” historical novels with strong female characters who take no guff from anyone of either gender. It’s a swashbuckling adventure complete with decks slippery with blood, the deafening boom of cannon fire; with old Andrew Jackson and elegant Jean Lafitte; with a love triangle, violent jealousy, and enough sexual tension to sink Le Faucon de Mer. It ends with a satisfactory twist that you know will become a happily-ever-after, as a good romance should.

If you think you would feel uneasy reading f/f sex scenes, you can skip them; there are not many and they are brief, nor are they overly graphic. Please don’t use them as a reason not to read The Sea Hawk. I really believe you’d enjoy it. I haven’t read very many f/f novels, but the few I have read have been very good. I enthusiastically add The Sea Hawk to that number and recommend it highly.

The author has a really great video trailer at her website www.brenda-adcock.com