Required Disclosure: All Books reviewed herein were either bought by Ruth Sims or the guest reviewer or borrowed from a public library. No free galley, ARC or finished book was given in exchange for a favorable review or for a review of any kind.

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The Wild Man
By
Patricia Nell Warren
Author of The Front Runner
9781889135052 Paperback
Publisher: Wildcat Press
Available in both Spanish and English

Spain. 1960’s.
Look into the heart of aristocratic torero Antonio Escudero. At 29 he knows he is getting too old to remain in the ring and no longer has the passion for killing bulls. His body is scarred from the horns of the mighty creatures; his soul is scarred from loneliness. His dreams lie in another direction: saving the land and wildlife of Spain, ravaged by many years of civil war and oppression by Franco’s vicious fascist regime. In Franco’s Spain men like Antonio, whose desire is for other men, are only imprisoned—if they’re lucky. Those without money, a noble name, or property are tortured and killed without trial. Antonio thinks often of the great Spanish poet and homosexual, Federico Lorca, who was murdered by Fascists, his body never found.

Antonio’s physical need sometimes drives him to male prostitutes, especially while on tour in other countries where it is safer; He has never known what it is to love another man and does not even consider it a possibility. One day a young worker saves him from unexpected danger in the street. The stranger is Juan Diano, a blond peasant from the mountains, a few years younger than Antonio. It is a rescue that will change the lives of many people forever. Juan is barely educated, but his heart is filled with the same passion for the land and animals that Antonio has. Their lives become intertwined, though often shaken by distrust and pride and class differences as well as the ever-present threat from the Catholic Church’s strict moral laws and members of the corrupt government.

With The Wild Man, Patricia Nell Warren, in her guise as the journalist called Paty, relates the story of the aristocrat and the peasant, as Antonio Escudero tells it to her. It’s the story of love, and persecution, jealousy and political hatred of one brother for another. It’s the story of two men who love each other through persecution and exile, often battling themselves and each other. It’s also the story of two women who love each other, one of them Anthonio’s twin sister. It’s the story of four young people living bitterly amusing corkscrew lives because they are forced to hide who and what they are. It’s the story of Antonio, who has much but is willing to give it all away to save Juan from certain torture and death. And overarching it all is the menacing power of the fascist state in tandem with a spirit-crushing state church. It’s the story of people who love their country but must live in exile in a foreign land. Not until the last word is the reader sure that Antonio and Juan are completely are at peace with each other.

This is not a cupcake book. The writing is as tough, passionate, and compassionate as the lives Warren portrays. It is obvious that Warren knows and loves Spain, and that she knows and understands the dangers of living under both fascism and a government theocracy.

The arrangement of The Wild Man is that of “bookends,” with the journalist, Paty, telling in the “Author’s Prologue” how she comes to meet Antonio Escudero as a man in his 60’s, living as an exile in California.

The bulk of the story is told in Antonio’s words. An “Author’s Postlogue” brings the story of Antonio and Juan, his sister and her partner up to the mid-90’s, 25 years after their escape to America. I was especially glad that Warren went a step farther, with a section of “Notes and Acknowledgments” which is interesting and informative.

I truly love this book. If ever a book cried out, “Make me into a film!” it’s The Wild Man. Also available in Spanish as El Hombre Bravo.

Thai Died--print

Print book from Green Candy Press

ThaiDied e-book

E-Book from MLR Press

THAI DIED
By
William Maltese
Publisher: Green Candy Press (January 24, 2003)
IBN-10: 1931160139
ISBN-13: 978-1931160131
Also available from MLR Press as an E-Book
ISBN#978-1-60820-051-1 (ebook)

Reviewer: Ruth Sims

Is he or isn’t he? Gay, that is. Or bi. Does anyone know for certain? Does Stud Draqual, himself, know? Does he even care?

All we know for certain is that Stud is his real name, he is a world-traveling silk merchant, a self-described “famous designer of silken underwear for wealthy women,” a gorgeous man who attracts danger and excitement the way a dog attracts fleas. Within hours of his arrival in Thailand—a place he knows well—he has been shot at and, by virtue of being in the wrong place at the wrong time, been nearly blown to smithereens. Not even recovered from that, he finds himself in a sanctuary with a bugged phone, and before you can blink, he’s face down in the back of a taxi with a smelly blanket covering him, on the way to … he doesn’t know where. And that’s just in the first sixty pages!

Nor are danger and intrigue all that follows the aptly named Stud; men and women, all equally beautiful and dangerous, throw themselves in his path and Stud seldom sees a reason to step aside or avert his eyes. When he does manage to step aside or avert his eyes another portion of his anatomy tends to pay attention.

If you like books that are sexy, violent, exotic, fascinating, and funny, and where the brisk dialogue, ironic asides, and pithy observations never flag, you’ll love Thai Died.

Maltese is a master of his craft, whether he’s describing Thailand’s gorgeous buildings and beautiful people, its squalor and filth, or the shocking murder of an exotic dancer in a private BDSM club, during a performance, in full view of the audience.

As with many of Maltese’s books, there is a lot of explicit sex. Chances are your granny, your third grade teacher, and your preacher would be horrified (or not. How well do you know them, anyway?) Although Maltese has recently written Young Adult fiction, this ain’t it. I’m not particularly a fan of explicit sex in fiction, but when it’s done with style and panache, and the scenes are an integral part of the story rather than something thrown in to get the reader’s rocks off, I’m okay with it.

The number of books bearing the name of William Maltese just keeps growing… and growing … and growing, as does his popularity.

Recommended – but for over 18 only.
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